As popular as the skull and bones was, as time progressed it was replaced by a similar figure of an angelic winged head, which signified the Resurrection of the deceased rising to heaven.  These came in many guises, for example in Renaissance art they were depicted as cherubims, to signify the souls of the Blessed. Another form of symbolism that became popular during the Eighteenth Century was the addition of vegetation, such as palm fronds, leaf fronds, fruit etc, which signified the renewal of life.

Below are just a few examples of the different mortality symbols that can be found in graveyards. Please click on image for larger size.

The Urn Carrier
The Urn Carrier
Kirkmichael Burial Ground, Resolis
The Clasping Hands
The Clasping Hands
Gaelic Cemetery, Cromarty
The Cruxifiction
The Cruxifiction
Fortrose Old Burial Ground, Fortrose
The Holy Spirit
The Holy Spirit
Cullicudden Old Burial Ground, Cullicudden
The Griffins
The Griffins
Parish Churchyard, Rosemarkie
The Stag
The Stag
Chapel Yard, Inverness
Old Father Time
Old Father Time
Fortrose Cathedral, Fortrose
The Avoch Urn
The Avoch Urn
Avoch Burial Ground, Avoch
The Lady in the Trees
The Lady in the Trees
Old Rosskeen Burial Ground, Rosskeen
The Rosskeen Mausoleum
The Rosskeen Mausoleum
Old Rosskeen Burial Ground, Rosskeen
Kirkhill Priest 1
Kirkhill Priest 1
Kirkhill Burial Ground, Kirkhill, Nr Beauly
Kirkhill Priest 2
Kirkhill Priest 2
Kirkhill Burial Ground, Kirkhill, Nr Beauly
The Shell Marker
The Shell Marker
Chapel Yard, Inverness
The Avoch Twins
The Avoch Twins
Old Churchyard, Avoch
Extended Triskele
Extended Triskele
Gaelic Chapel Cemetery, Cromarty
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